Mentoring the tech leaders of tomorrow

Updated October 23, 2018
Mentoring the tech leaders of tomorrow
One of the investments the City makes to fortify our resources is providing mentorship to our community’s future leaders. This workforce is a dynamic commodity. Our teams have discovered that when we provide our area high-school students with the opportunity to explore real-life technologies, they possess a richer context to investigate new career paths.

Roseville Police Sergeant Christopher Ciampa discusses a technology used by first responders with the Tech Teen members.
Roseville Police Sergeant Christopher Ciampa discusses a technology used by first responders with the Tech Teen members.

For the past six years, the Tech Teens Leadership Academy has provided this insight to our youth. The group provides access to real-world technologies. Be it cybersecurity or crime scene analysis, the need to embrace technology is critical for our future protection.

Christopher Hardy, a business systems analyst for the City's Information Technology Department, leads this group of students along with a talented team of City volunteers. “We show the students that there’s more to IT than just coding or client services,” Christopher said. “We demonstrate project management and real-world applications. The students take on a different perspective to data and technology when they have the opportunity to engage professionals directly.”

An unmanned aircraft system (UAS), or drone, used by Roseville first responders. 
An unmanned aircraft system (UAS), or drone, used by Roseville first responders.

Hardy said the students are hungry for information. “We recently explored Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) two weeks ago. So we took the group into our lab where we look at crime scene analysis, fingerprints, and a lot of science-based information. At the end of the tour, the instructor asked if anyone had any questions. One student asked, “how do I become you?”

That student is Roseville High School Senior Jessica Daly. “We went into the evidence lab and what you see there is so much different than what you see on TV,” Jessica added “The real-life CSI is more of a hands-on kind of job. I like to be behind the scenes. It was interesting to be able to see everything in the lab.”

Roseville High School Senior Jessica Daly (Center) listens to Chris Hardey lead an activity with the group
Roseville High School Senior Jessica Daly (Center) listens to Chris Hardy lead an activity with the group.

Jessica stated that she is looking to pursue a college degree in criminal justice after she graduates. In the meantime, she is applying for an internship with the FBI Academy.

Christopher Hardy and his crew are seeing a defined return on their investment of time and effort. “It’s important that we do this today, sharing this technology; we’re making an investment on tomorrow. Everything is interconnected.”

October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month. The importance of this effort is to share and learn that cybersecurity is a daily activity. It's up to each of us to protect ourselves, our families, and our data in cyberspace.

It is critical that every internet user understands that if you are online, you are under attack. Somewhere, somehow, someone is looking to steal your information. Please take every opportunity to protect yourself in cyberspace. Understand that cyber thieves are taking every opportunity to steal your information