Entertaining Back Yard Landscape Plan



Download the Entertaining Landscape Plan

Key Features:

  • This back yard landscape has a number of “rooms” for entertaining – a dining area with outdoor kitchen, a raised deck with benches, a lawn area with fire pit, and a private courtyard off the master bedroom with an arbor and raised planters.
  • Ground surfaces include decomposed granite and flagstone set in sand for permeability with ornamental grasses and Thyme planted within some of the joints.
  • Shade trees and low-water use plants are used throughout the landscape.

Symbol

Botanical Name

Common Name

Trees

T1

Cercis Canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’

Forest Pansy Eastern Redbud

T2

Prunus caroliniana ‘Bright ‘n Tight’

Bright ‘n Tight Cherry-Laurel

T3

Pyrus ‘Chanticleer’

Chanticleer/Cleveland Select Pear

T4

Vitex agnus-castus

Chaste Tree

Shrubs

S1

Arctostaphylos “Emerald Carpet’

Emerald Carpet Manzanita

S2

Cistus ‘Sunset’

Sunset Rockrose

S3

Cotinus coggygria

Smoke Tree/Bush

S4

Lavandula x intermedia ‘Grosso’

Grosso Long-Stemmed Lavender

S5

Leptospermum scoparium ‘Ruby Glow’

Ruby Glow New Zealand Tea Tree

S6

Leptospermum scoparium ‘Snow White’

Snow White New Zealand Tea Tree

S7

Mahonia acquifolium ‘Compacta’

Oregon Grape

S8

Mahonia repens

Creeping Mahonia

S9

Nandina domestica ‘Harbor Dwarf’

Harbor Dwarf Heavenly Bamboo

S10

Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Blue Spires’

Blue Spires Rosemary

S11

Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Huntington Carpet’

Huntington Carpet Rosemary

Ground Cover

GC1

Thymus x citriodorus

Lemon Thyme

Vines

V1

Vitis californica ‘Rogers Red’

Roger’s Red California Wild Grape

Perennials

P1

Phormium tenax ‘Atropurpureum’

New Zealand Flax

P2

Phormium ‘Platt’s Black’

Platt’s Black New Zealand Flax

P3

Salvia clevelandii

Cleveland Sage

Grasses

G1

Festuca idahoensis ‘Siskyou Blue’

Siskyou Blue Idaho Fescue

G2

Nassella tenuissima

Mexican Feather Grass

ENTERTAINING BACK YARD

 LOW-VOLUME IRRIGATION HYDROZONES*

Zone

Description of Plant Material

Emission Devices

1

Trees (sparse planting)

Root zone watering systems (with bubblers), adjustable bubblers, or single outlet emitters

2

Large shrubs (sparse planting)

Adjustable bubblers, single outlet emitters (bug-type), or in-line pressure compensating dripline

3

Shrubs and perennials (sparse planting)

Single outlet emitters or in-line pressure compensating dripline

4

Shrubs and perennials (sparse planting)

Single outlet emitters

5

Lawn

Low-volume, multi-stream rotator sprinklers

6

Grouped plants - Shrubs, perennials, vine, and ornamental grasses (dense planting)

Multiple outlet emission device with drip emitters (bug-type) or single outlet emitters

*HYDROZONE

The word “hydrozone” is used to describe the practice of grouping plants that have similar water requirements.  Hydrozoning is a key component of a water-efficient irrigation system and landscape.  Effective hydrozoning requires an understanding of plants, the rate in which water moves into and through the soil (infiltration rate), soil type and texture, landscape design, irrigation, drainage, slope, sun exposure, and weather conditions.

 Hydrozones divide a landscape irrigation system based upon individual plant water requirements, plant height, and planting density. Plant species with similar needs are selected and grouped within each hydrozone. It is also effective to create microclimate zones so that plants with higher water needs are closest to the house and plants with lower water needs are on the perimeter of the garden or landscape.

 Each hydrozone will contain plants that will be irrigated on the same schedule, using the same irrigation method.  Generally, each hydrozone is served by one valve or control zone (although more than one valve may be required to service an area due to flow and water pressure). By using controllers with multiple run times that are able to support low-volume systems (cycle and soak) and by dividing the landscape into hydrozones, each area will receive the amount of water it needs without puddling or runoff.

The result of hydrozoning is improved plant health and less water use.