Archives


Wastewater utility receives national recognition
News ImageRoseville’s Wastewater Utility has been recognized as a “Utility of the Future Today” by the Utility of the Future Recognition Program. The program celebrates the progress and exceptional performance of the nation’s wastewater utilities.

Free medication take back day October 22
News ImageIf you've got old or unwanted medications, start gathering them for our Take Back Day on October 22. Dropping them off is a better, safe alternative.

Bug of the Month: Leaffooted Bug
News ImageWhen you are inspecting your garden this summer, you will find many interesting things to observe. One insect you may notice is a strange looking bug that can be over one-inch long and has an unusual appendage on its legs that looks like a leaf is attached. This bug is called the Leaffooted Bug, and it can do some damage to tomatoes, pomegranates, citrus and other ripe fruit. The damage is caused when this insect pierces the skin of ripe fruit and inserts a large sucking mouth part to the extract the juices.

Customers encouraged to continue water saving ways
News ImageEarlier this year, Mother Nature greeted us with increased rainfall and a healthy snowpack, positioning us with ample water supplies throughout the spring and summer. This change was a welcome sight to many in Northern California—and provided much needed relief from drought conditions.

Five staffers with highest state certification in water distribution
News ImageUnderneath Roseville is an intricate distribution system that allows water to move from Folsom Lake through miles of piping before it reaches customers’ taps. The distribution system includes water mains, service lines, water meters, fire hydrants, backflow devices, and groundwater wells—all necessary infrastructure to keep highly treated and safe water flowing so that customers have it when needed.

Managing mosquitos this summer
News ImageThe mosquito is an insect that can ruin a meal on the patio or make an evening walk unbearable or even dangerous. This bug is probably the most dangerous insect on the planet. It transmits disease, breeds rapidly in very little water, lives in many different climates around the world, and is enemy number one for many countries that are trying to control serious diseases.


Organics commercial recycling starts up this year
News ImageNew this year is a requirement for commercial businesses, like restaurants, coffee shops, and other places that generate food waste, to source separate organic waste from regular trash.


Two utility projects win top honors
News Image

Two Environmental Utilities (EU) infrastructure projects and the staff that managed them were among other regional projects that received top notch awards at the Sacramento Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers ceremony held at the Crocker Art Museum in May.



Mahany Park goes purple with recycled water
News ImageRoseville's Parks, already a large user of recycled water in Roseville – has added one of its largest parks to the recycled water system. Completed just in time for this year’s irrigation season, Mahany Park, located at the corner of Woodcreek Oaks and Pleasant Grove Boulevard, will save about 29 million gallons annually of potable water with this change.

New approach adopted for statewide water conservation
News ImageJust a couple of weeks ago, the State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) took action easing statewide water conservation rules that have been in place for more than a year because of the drought.

Acknowledging that water conditions in many parts of the state have improved, the State Water Board voted to eliminate the statewide 25 percent water savings approach and, in its place, are new rules that give water agencies like Roseville local control over conservation.

Ditching lawn for something more water wise
News ImageEnvironmental Utilities (EU) customers are doing an amazing job lowering their water use through conservation programs. Roseville residents Jere and Lako Myers last year participated in EU’s highly successful Cash for Grass program.

Economic prosperity and water supply planning
News ImageRoseville is a progressive city, focused on providing services to our community for a smart, sustainable future. Part of that future includes recent gains in economic development as our economy recovers from the Great Recession-- all the while facing an unprecedented several years of drought conditions. A telltale sign of economic recovery is increased commercial and housing growth, not only in Roseville, but throughout the greater Sacramento region and statewide. We often get asked, what are we doing to ensure there is enough water to support existing and future customers.

To flush or not to flush?
News ImageJust because the package reads “flushable” doesn’t mean it’s true. Items marked as disposable or flushable do not degrade like toilet paper, and they wind up clogging pipes, lift stations and creating havoc during the wastewater treatment process. This translates into millions in clean up and repair costs.

Roseville explores creating energy from waste
News ImageWork is underway right now to develop a project that would one day help power one of Environmental Utilities’ (EU) wastewater treatment plants or provide fleet vehicle fuel using Compressed Natural Gas (CNG).

Lab manager receives analyst of the year award
News ImageSome might not know that the City has a lab staffed with seven employees with the primary goal of testing water quality. Located at the Dry Creek and Pleasant Grove Wastewater Treatment Plants, lab workers collect samples from several sites, testing drinking water, domestic and industrial wastewater, stormwater and recycled water to ensure they’re in regulatory compliance. You also might not know that laboratory manager Kim Spear, a 25-year-employee with EU's water quality lab, is a recent winner for Laboratory Analyst of the Year from the Sacramento Area Section California Water Environment Association (CWEA).

Roseville's wastewater collection group gets top notch award
News ImageMany don’t think of their wastewater collection system because it’s infrastructure that is usually out of sight. Deep below our city is an intricate network of sewer pipes and laterals that equate to about 735 miles—the same distance as three and a half roundtrips from Roseville to San Francisco.

Statewide water use restrictions continue through this October
News ImageThe State Water Board took action last evening, continuing water use restrictions through October. Because of the tireless efforts of many water agencies throughout the region, our collective voice was heard. A climate adjustment is now part of the emergency drought regulations, which moves Roseville’s target from 28 percent down to 25 percent.

New water rates take effect February 8
News ImageFollowing a several month rate case process, City Council approved a water utility rate proposal on December 16. As a result, Roseville water customers will see changes to their bill beginning February 8, including the elimination of the 15 percent drought surcharge. Customers interested in understanding what the rate increase is for their home can use our water rate calculator.

Continue the water saving trend in 2016
News ImageThe Sacramento region reduced water use by 30 percent in 2015. For Roseville, it was a whopping 33 percent! Now that we have begun a new year, lets continue the great work. Not sure if your New Year's resolution including saving water but get our top four things you can do to continue the water saving trend!

Roseville’s water wise rebates remain
News ImageEnvironmental Utilities still has funding available for water efficiency rebates. Residential and business customers that are looking to save water should consider these rebate opportunities because they translate into money saved during the conversion and afterwards as you begin to save money on reduced water usage.

View Archive